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Bojack Horseman No.1 Alcoholic Horse on Netflix

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Airing as a Netflix exclusive, Bojack Horseman is probably the number 1 alcoholic horse on Netflix and possibly the best animated TV show about alcoholic horses this year. With two seasons and a Christmas episode, the series takes us through the misadventures of a ‘90s sitcom star trying to get his life together. Humans and anthropomorphic animals collide as Bojack Horseman consistently alienates friends, romantic interests, and professional contacts. Bojack serves as an anti-hero in the series. He’s so completely narcissistic and misguided that you can’t help but hate him, but you also can’t help but hope that he gets his life together.

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Will Arnett provides his voice for the titular horse, and he creates a sense of natural arrogance, but also very much some hurt and frustration that makes him an extremely well-developed character. The rest of the characters are a little more one-dimensional, but still provide a good baseline to support Bojack in his character arcs. Aaron Paul showcases a lot of comedic talent as Bojack’s naïve roommate, Todd. Alison Brie is painfully sincere as Bojack’s ghostwriter, Diane. And Amy Sedaris often steals the show as Princess Caroline, Bojack’s agent and ex.

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Created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg, Bojack Horseman is surprisingly subtle and contemplative, despite its often exploitative nature. The show differentiates itself from cringe-shows like Curb Your Enthusiasm and Extras because while there is plenty of cringe-humor throughout, that’s not the emphasis of the show. The emphasis of the show is about depression, and because of this, it becomes incredibly relatable, even though the main character is a celebrity, and a horse. The show even shows some self-awareness that Bojack is relatable, despite his extreme nature. And even when good things happen to Bojack, life is still depressing to him, making the whole experience a hysterical exercise in futility.

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Each episode stands on its own, but there are various callbacks and plot points that carry on from previous episodes. The show isn’t incredibly plot-oriented, but it definitely progresses as the series goes on, making it the perfect show to binge. There aren’t many filler episodes or episodes that exist to move the plot forward, but there’s a sense of movement, and the show doesn’t seem the same every episode, making it easy to watch several in one sitting.

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The animation is simplistic and strikingly beautiful. There’s a quality to it that appears hand drawn, which makes it feel all the more personal. The title sequence is particularly touching, as we see a close-up of Bojack’s face, while the background changes to the different places and people in Bojack’s life. Occasionally, the show gets too depressing, and you hate Bojack a little too much, but these instances are always in between sequences that redeem Bojack in some way, or at least make you dislike him a little less. At times, the show gets a little too convoluted, and some of the actions that occur don’t seem to hold any weight in the series, but for the most part, Bojack Horseman is incredibly touching and enjoyable experience to watch.

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